Alcohol-Related Traffic Crashes and Drunk Drivers

Ten percent (10%) of all people who receive injuries in traffic accidents do so in alcohol-related crashes, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). It is estimated that 3.22% of these injury-producing crashes involve intoxicated drivers.

Seven percent (7%) of all traffic accidents involve alcohol use, according to NHTSA. It is estimated that 2.25% of all vehicular crashes involve intoxicated drivers.

 

For more on alcohol-related and other traffic statistics, visit:
Intoxicated Driver Statistics,
Alcohol-Related Traffic Fatalities, and
Alcohol as a Cause of Traffic Accidents.

For more about the problem of impaired or drunk driving and how to prevent it, visit:
Drinking and Driving,
Drunk Driving Can be Stopped, and
Young Drivers and Alcohol.

References

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filed under: Drinking and Driving