How to Help Someone Who Drinks Too Much Alcohol

Anne M. Fletcher approached the question of how to help those who drink too much in a very logical way. She asked hundreds of people who had successfully dealt with their drinking problems how other people had helped them either moderate or eliminate their drinking.

The results are summarized in the following nine recommendations that are included in her book Sober for Good: New Solutions for Drinking Problems -- Advice from Those who Have Succeeded.

To learn more about each of these recommendations, see her chapter titled “You Can Help.”

One of the five major myths that Anne Fletcher dispels in this book is that there’s nothing that others can do to help a person with a drinking problem until that person is ready.

 

This web site does not provide medical opinion or advice and it receives no benefit from the sale of Sober for Good.

References

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See Also

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