Kansas Alcohol Laws: Would Carry Nation Approve?

Background of Kansas Alcohol Laws

kansas alcohol laws

Vern Miller

Kansas alcohol laws prohibited the sale of alcohol from 1881 to 1948. During 1971-1976, Kansas Attorney General Vern Miller raided Amtrak trains. He did so to stop them from selling alcohol. He also prohibited airlines from serving alcoholic beverages in airspace over the state.

Miller insisted that “Kansas goes all the way up and all the way down.” His legal opinion was widely ridiculed in legal circles. Kansas continued to prohibit the sale of alcohol for consumption on-premises until 1987.

Kansas has never ratified the Twenty-First Amendment ending National Prohibition.

kansas alcohol laws

Carry A. Nation

Kansas is closely associated with Carry A. Nation. (Her first name is also spelled Carrie.) It was in Kansas that she began using her hatchet to destroy bars. She also destroyed pharmacies that legally sold alcohol by doctors’ prescription. Yet Carry Nation died over a century ago. Much has changed. However, would she be pleased with Kansas alcohol laws today? You be the judge.

I. Minimum Age Laws

      Overview

I.   Minimum Age Laws
II.  Alcohol Violations
III.Resources
IV. Seek Good Advice

Young people often want to work part-time. And hospitality has many jobs. So youths need to know the age for working with alcohol. How old must one be to serve alcohol in a venue for drinking on site? To tend bar? To sell alcohol for consumption elsewhere?

Adults aged 18 or older may be servers in venues that sell alcohol for consumption on-site. But a manager or supervisor must be present. Employees must be at least 21 to work as bartenders.

Only liquor stores may sell wine, spirits and beer with over 3.2% ABW. That’s alcohol by weight. Employees at such stores must be at least 21. However, they may sell near beer at other venues if they are adults. That is, if they are 18 or older.”

Kansas alcohol laws permit persons under age 21 to drink “near beer.”(1) However, the young person’s parent or legal guardian must provide the beverage. But there are no state restrictions about where the near beer may be consumed.

No one under age 21 may legally purchase any alcohol. That includes near beer. And any use of a false ID to obtain alcoholic beverage is a criminal offense. Furthermore, even lending, transferring, or selling a false ID is a criminal act in Kansas.

It’s also illegal for anyone under age 21 to drive with 0.02% or more alcohol in their blood.

II. Alcohol Violations

Selling & Buying Alcohol

kansas alcohol lawsOnly licensed liquor stores may sell alcohol for consumption off-premises. Grocery stores and gas stations may sell near beer. No alcoholic beverage may be sold between 11:00 PM and 9:00 AM. Nor may any be sold on Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas.

Some counties permit alcohol to be sold for consumption on-premises. Retailers may then sell beer, wine, and spirits any day of the week. However, they may not sell between 2 a.m. and 9 a.m.

Bars may now offer happy-hour specials. But they may not

  • Offer free drinks.
  • Have “All you can drink” specials.
  • Offer drinks as prizes.

Farm wineries may offer samples and sell bottles their wine their farms and special events. Similarly, microdistilleries may offer free samples and sell bottles of their spirits at the distillery.

It’s illegal to sell alcohol to anyone under 21. It’s also illegal for such persons to buy or try to buy alcohol. However, it’s legal for those under 21 to try to buy alcohol for police entrapment of clerks or servers.

Possessing an unregistered, unlabeled beer keg is also illegal. The penalty is imprisonment for up to six months and a fine up to $1,000. Destroying the label on a keg is also illegal. Violations carry the same penalty.

Dry Counties

Many counties in Kansas are dry or they have very restrictive alcohol laws. Often, only “near beer” is sold. That’s beer with alcohol content of 3.2% or less.

1 Barber
2 Chautauqua
3 Cherokee
4 Clark
5 Clay
6 Comanche
7 Doniphan
8 Elk
9 Gove
10 Grant
11 Greeley
12 Hamilton
13 Harper
14 Haskell
15 Jewell
16 Kiowa
17 Lane
18 Logan
19 Meade
20 Morton
21 Osborne
22 Ottawa
23 Rice
24 Scott
25 Sheridan
26 Stafford
27 Stanton
28 Stevens
29 Wallace
30 Wichita
31 Woodson

Discover more at Dry Counties. Perhaps Carry Nation would be pleased with the laws after all.

Driving and Alcohol

kansas alcohol lawsKansas alcohol laws prohibit driving with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08% or higher. For commercial drivers, it’s 0.04% or higher. And for those under 21, including adults, it’s 0.02%. These offenses are driving under the influence (DUI).

First Offense Penalties
  • Mandatory imprisonment of 48 hours.
  • Community service requirement of 100 hours.
  • Fine of $750 to $1,000 plus court costs.
  • Mandatory completion of safety education or a drug and alcohol evaluation at offender’s expense.
  • License suspension for 30 days.
  • After suspension, ignition interlock device (IID) required for 180 days. Offender pays for installation, maintenance, and monitoring.
Second Offense Penalties
  • Mandatory imprisonment for from five days to one year.
  • Imprisonment followed by supervised probation for one year.
  • Fine of $1,250 to $1,750 plus court costs and probation fees.
  • Mandatory completion of alcohol and drug treatment program at offender’s expense.
  • License suspension for one year.
  • After suspension, IID required for one year. Offender pays for installation, maintenance, and monitoring.
Third Offense Penalties
  • kansas alcohol lawsMandatory imprisonment for 90 days to one year.
  • Imprisonment followed by supervised probation for one year.
  • Fine of $1,750 to $2,500 plus court costs and probation fees.
  • Mandatory completion of alcohol and drug treatment program at offender’s expense.
  • License suspension for one year.
  • After suspension, IID required for two years. Offender pays for installation, maintenance, and monitoring.
Fourth Offense Penalties
  • Mandatory imprisonment for 90 days to one year.
  • Imprisonment followed by supervised probation for one year.
  • Fine of $2,500 plus court costs and probation fees.
  • Mandatory completion of alcohol and drug treatment program at offender’s expense.
  • License suspension for one year.
  • After suspension, IID required for three years. Offender pays for installation, maintenance, and monitoring.
Fifth Offense Penalties
  • kansas alcohol lawsMandatory imprisonment for 90 days to one year.
  • Imprisonment followed by supervised probation for one year.
  • Fine of $2,500 plus court costs and probation fees.
  • License suspension for one year.
  • After suspension, IID required for ten years. Offender pays for installation, maintenance, and monitoring.
Driver Rights

All drivers have a U.S. Constitutional right to refuse chemical alcohol or drug tests. Until recently, Kansas punished as criminals drivers who used their right.

However, the Kansas Supreme Court held that doing so violated their Constitutional right. Learn more at Kansas Supreme Court: Law Making It a Crime to Refuse DUI Chemical Testing Is Unconstitutional.

The state continues to punish drivers who use their right. But they continue to do it administratively, not criminally. That is, Kansas still suspends their driving licenses. But it can no longer imprison people for using their Fourth Amendment right.

kansas alcohol lawsOn the other hand, there is no legal penalty for declining to submit to a field sobriety test. These are highly subjective and notoriously unreliable. For example, about one-third of completely sober people fail the test. That is, about one of three people with zero BAC (0.00%) fail.

Lawyers strongly urge drivers to politely decline submitting to a field sobriety test. When an officer pulls a driver over for suspected DUI, the driver is a crime suspect. An officer is never a friend or ally of a crime suspect.

Officers learn clever ways to talk drivers into taking field sobriety tests. And it’s completely legal for an officer to mislead, be dishonest, or lie to a suspect.

Discover much more at Never Take a Field Sobriety Test Say DUI Lawyers.

Boating and Alcohol

kansas alcohol lawsKansas alcohol laws prohibit operating or attempting to operate any boat under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs. Specifically, it’s illegal operate a boat with a BAC of 0.08 or higher. That’s an objective number. It’s also illegal to operate with alcohol and/or drugs such they can’t operate safely. That’s subjective.

It is also illegal to water ski or tube under the influence. Penalties for Boating Under the Influence (BUI) include fines up to $500 and imprisonment of up to one year.

Using the right not to submit to a chemical test results in these punishments.

  • Prohibition against boating for three months.
  • Mandated completion of an approved boater education program for which boater pays.
  • Fines up to $500.

It’s legal to possess and consume alcohol on a boat. But an intoxicated operator who lets anyone under 12 drive the boat is guilty of BUI. The same is true of letting anyone born after 12/31/1988 who hasn’t completed a boater safety course drive it.

III. Resources on Kansas Alcohol LawsKansas alcohol laws

IV. Seek Good Advice

Laws about alcohol change. So do legal interpretations. Law is always in flux. Kansas alcohol laws, as those of all states, can be confusing. Because of that, never rely on this site.

kansas alcohol lawsAlways get information or advice about Kansas alcohol laws from an expert. That would be a lawyer holding a license in the state.

 

Reference for Kansas Alcohol Laws

1. Kan. Stat. Ann. s. 41-2701 and Kan. Stat. Ann. s. 41-727.