Prohibition Places Associated with Temperance History

Prohibition (1920-1933) was a national phenomenon. Therefore, prohibition places associated with temperance are found across the country. Perhaps you live in or near one of these prohibition places.

A number of places have temperance fountains.  They reflect the quaintly naive belief was that if people had water to drink they would be less likely to drink alcohol. Most were built by the  Woman’s Christian Temperance Union  (WCTU).

Some temperance fountains were built by the eccentric philanthropist, Dr. Henry Cogswell. He designed them himself. But he had no training in architecture, no skill, and little or no taste. Some were destroyed by vandals shortly after construction. Few remain in existence today.

prohibition places

Dr. Henry Cogswell

No two of any of these many fountains are alike and all are fascinating to visit. They are tangible reminders of the temperance movement. They might  be seen as vestiges of the past and of discredited ideas. Yet, these ideas might not really be dead.

Today, nearly one of every five adults in the U.S. favors making the consumption of alcohol illegal. Not even National Prohibition  actually  prohibited drinking. People could make alcoholic beverages for themselves. But it was illegal to sell beverage alcohol except for religious, scientific, industrial, or medical purposes. For the latter, a doctor’s prescription was required. But those were easy to get.

Even more people today support neo-prohibition. They would like alcohol to be stigmatized and those who drink, no matter how little, to be marginalized.

Prohibition Places Listed Alphabetically

Adams, MA was the birthplace (February 15, 1820) of Susan B. Anthony.

Adams County, OH was the birthplace (August 26, 1827) of Sarah “Annie” Turner Wittenmyer. She was the first president of the WCTU.

Alleghney, NY is the location of a  WCTU) temperance fountain.

Amherst, MA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Anacortes, WA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Arbela, MO was the birthplace (February 2, 1869) of Senator Smith Wildman Brookhart, known as a “fervent dry. To the end of his life (in 1944, long after Repeal), he insisted that “liquor is a poison and drinking it is a crime.”

Arcata, CA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

prohibition places

KKK: Defender of Prohibition

Ashland, AL was the birthplace (September 26, 1881) of Hiram Wesley Evans. He was head of the highly prohibitionist Ku Klux Klan.

Atlanta, GA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain. It’s on the main floor of the Georgia State Capitol.  (Click to see photo of the fountain.)

Atlantic City, NJ was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1912.

Auburn, NY was the birthplace (March 3, 1823) of Diocletion Lewis. His preaching inspired the Women’s Temperance Crusade.

Avon, NY is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Ayer, MA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.  (See photo.)

Baltimore, MD was the birthplace (April 16, 1838) of temperance leader Martha McClellan Brown. She and two other women formed the WCTU. Baltimore was also the birthplace (September 12, 1846) of Joshua Levering. He was the presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in the election of 1896.

Baton Rouge, LA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Bay Village, Dover Bay, OH  was the birthplace (November 29, 1903) of E. Harold Munn. He was the presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in the  election of 1968.

prohibition places

Roy Olmstead while a police sergeant.

Beaver City, NE was the birthplace (September 18, 1886) of Roy Olmstead. Beginning as a police officer, he ending being a major bootlegger.

Bedford, PA was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 2005.

Bellefontaine, OH was the birthplace (December 25, 1858) of Herman P. Faris. He was the presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in the election of 1924.  

Bellefonte, PA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Bethel, CT was the birthplace (July 5, 1810) of prohibitionist showman P.T. Barnum. Learn how he promote temperance in his shows.

Bird-in-Hand, PA was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1999.

Birmingham, AL was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1979.

Blaine, ME was the birthplace (June 17, 1917) of Benjamin C. Bubar, Jr. He was the presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in both 1976 and 1980.

Block Island, RI is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Bloomington, IN is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain

Boise, ID is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain

Boston, MA was where the first attempt to impose prohibition in the New World occurred. Governor John Winthrop attempted to prohibit all alcoholic beverages in the city in 1630.  It was also where the  American Temperance Society was established on February 13, 1826.   Boston was the birthplace (July 21, 1853) of Anna Adams Gordon. She was president of the WCTU when Prohibition went into effect. The Scientific Temperance Federation was created there in 1906. Boston Common was the location of one of Dr. Henry Cogwell’s fountains. Boston is one of the most significant prohibition places in the country.

Brazil, IN is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.  (See photo.)

Brockton, MA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

prohibition places

Wayne Wheeler

Brookfield, OH was the birthplace (November 10,1869) of Wayne B. Wheeler.  He was recognized as one of the several most powerful Prohibition leaders in the U.S.

Brooksville, IN  was the birthplace (February 25, 1833) of John P. St. John. He was the presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in the election of 1884.

Buffalo, NY was where the Royal Templars of Temperance was formed in 1870. It was also the location of one of the temperance fountains built by Dr. Henry Cogswell.

Burbank, CA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Canton, NY is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain. (See photo.)

Carlinville, IL was the birthplace (August 8, 1874) of William H. Anderson  He was the Anti-Saloon League leader in New York State.

Charleston, SC was the birthplace (January 28, 1880) of D. Leigh Colvin. He was the presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in 1936.

Chattanooga, TN was where the United Friends of Temperance was formed on November 22, 1871.

Chautauqua, NY is where an organizational meeting of the WCTU was held in August, 1874. It is also the location of a WCTU temperance fountain

prohibition places

Pauline Sabin, major Repeal leader.

Chicago, IL is where the founding convention of the Prohibition Party was held in 1869. It was the site of its subsequent conventions in 1900, 1928, and 1940.  Repeal leader Robert R. McCormick was born in the city on July 30, 1880.  Chicago was the birthplace (April 23, 1887) of Pauline Sabin. She formed and led the Women’s Organization for National Prohibition Reform.  It was the birthplace (September 28, 1893), of Marshall Field III. He was a leader in the Association Against the Prohibition Amendment. The Intercollegiate Prohibition Association was formed in the city in 1901. Chicago was Al Capone’s base of operations. It is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain. Chicago is one of the important Prohibition places in the U.S.

Churchville, NY was the birthplace (September 28, 1839) of  temperance activist  Frances Willard. It is also the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Cincinnati, OH was the birthplace (February 18, 1814) of Samuel F. Cary. He was well-known nationally as a prohibition author and lecturer. Cary, North Carolina, was named in his honor. Cincinnati  was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1892. Later, the city was the headquarters of the “King of the Bootleggers,” George Remus.  Earlier he had been a successful optometrist, pharmacist, lawyer, and owner of retail stores. Add to that list of accomplishments being a highly successful bootlegger.

Cleveland, Ohio was the place where the WCTU was founded in November of  1874. It was the site of the Prohibition Party conventions in 1876 and 1880.  The city was the birthplace (November 2, 1890) repeal leader Fred G. Clark. He founded The Crusaders in 1929 to promote Repeal.

Coldwater, MI was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1981. Coldwater sounds like a very appropriate place for any temperance activity.

Columbus, OH was the site of the Prohibition Party conventions in 1872, 1908, and 1924. It was also the first headquarters of the Anti-Saloon League in 1909.

Comers Rock , VA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Conway, MA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain. (See photo.)

Corydon, IN was the birthplace (October 1, 1865) of Lulu Markwell.  She was the first head of the national Women of the Ku Klux Klan (WKKK). Markwell was also president of the Arkansas Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU). The KKK and WCTU were partners in Prohibition.

Cotuit, MA was the birthplace (Sept 21, 1870) of Julian Codman. He was an influential leader of the Moderation League of New York.

Coudersport, PA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain. (See photo.)

prohibition places

“Pussyfoot” Johnson

Coventry, NY was the birthplace (March 25, 1862) of William E. Johnson, better known as “Pussyfoot Johnson.” By the time he died in 1945, long after Repeal, his was a household name across the country.

Cranston, RI is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Cranbury, NJ is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Cullman, AL was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 2011.

Deal Island, MD was the birthplace (Jan 24, 1826) of William Daniel. He was the vice-presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in 1884.

Decatur, IL is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Demorest, GA was established as a prohibition town in 1890. It was named in honor of W. Jennings Demorest. He was a well-known temperance speaker.

Denver, CO was the site of the Prohibition Party conventions in 1975 and 1995.

prohibition places

Henry B. Joy

Detroit, MI was the birthplace (November 23, 1864) of repeal leader Henry B. Joy. He was one of the founders of the The Republican Citizens Committee Against National Prohibition. Detroit was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1967. It’s also the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Dixon, IL is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Dover-Foxcroft, ME was the birthplace (March 1, 1844) of Lillian M. N. Stevens. She was the second president of the WCTU.

Edgewood, IA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Elizabeth, NJ was the birthplace (April 2, 1862) of Nicholas Murray Butler. He was a diplomat, president of Columbia University, and repeal leader.

Elmira, NY was the birthplace (May 17, 1904) of Rutherford Decker. He was the presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in the election of 1960.

Eureka Springs, AR is where Carry Nation lived and formed her ‘college’ before her death in 1911.

Evanston, IL is where the national headquarters of the WCTU moved in 1900. It is in the former home of Frances Willard.

Fairfield Glade, TN was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 2003.

Fall River, MA   was the location of one of Dr. Henry Cogwell‘s temperance fountains.

Fitzgerald, GA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Fowler, CA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Franklin, NY was the birthplace (January 6, 1793) of Edward C. Delavan. He was an early strong advocate for temperance. He even built a temperance hotel.

Fredonia, NY is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Fremont, OH was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1993 .

Gadsden, AL is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain. (See photo.)

prohibition places

Carry A. Nation

Garrard County, KY was the birthplace (Nov. 25, 1846) of Carry A. Nation.

Geneseo, NY was the birthplace (Aug 12, 1877) of James W. Wadsworth.  He was a leader  in the Association Against the Prohibition Amendment.

Glendive, MT is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain. (See photo.)

Glendora, CA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Gloucester, MA was the birthplace (July 6, 1875) Roger W. Babson. He was the presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in the election of 1940.

Greensboro, AL was the birthplace of (August 17, 1870) of Richmond Pearson Hobson,  a leading prohibitionist member of the U.S. House of Representatives.

Greensboro, NC is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Greensburg, PA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Griffin, GA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Griggsville, NY was the birthplace (December 8, 1828) of Clinton B. Fisk, temperance promoter. Fisk University is named in his honor.

Hadley, MA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Hallowell, ME was the birthplace (April 16, 1786) of temperance activist Dr. Thomas Sewall. His very graphic lithographs of the stomachs of alcoholics did much to intensify temperance sentiment.

Hamden, OH was the birthplace (November 24, 1877) of temperance leader Ernest H. Cherrington. He was a major force in the Anti-Saloon League.

Hanford, CA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

prohibition places

American Temperance University

Harriman, TN is a town founded in 1889 as a prohibition place by temperance activists. The American Temperance University was established in Harriman in 1893. It closed its doors in 1908.

Harvey, IL is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Hillsboro, OH was the birthplace (August 24, 1816) of  Eliza Thompson. Often called “Mother Thompson,” she is considered the founder of the Women’s Temperance Crusade. That was the origin of the WCTU.

Huntsville, AL is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Hopkinton, IA was the birthplace (October 20, 1869) of Repeal leader John Campbell Merriam. He was president of the Carnegie Institute.

Indianapolis, IN was the site of Prohibition Party conventions in 1888, 1904, 1932, 1943, 1951, 1997, and 2007.

Jackson, LA was near the plantation birthplace (1825) of Caroline Merrick. Her effective leadership of the WCTU in New Orleans caught the attention of the national leadership. She quickly became a leader in the national organization.

Jackson County, OH was the birthplace (April 10, 1858) of Purley A. Baker.  He was head of the powerful Anti-Saloon League and greatly expanded its activities.

Janesville, WI was near the farm birthplace of Edith Smith Davis.   She was head of two departments in the national WCTU and edited The Temperance Educational Quarterly.

prohibition places

WKKK Imperial Empress Daisy Douglas Barr

Jonesboro, IN was the birthplace (1876) of Daisy Douglas Barr. Rev. Barr was head of the Women’s KKK (WKKK) and its approximently 250,000 members. She was also very active in the WCTU.

Junction City, KS was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1973.

Kellyville, TX was the birthplace (October 20, 1908) of singing cowboy Carl Stuart Hamblen. He was the presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in the election of 1952.

Kenyon, MN was the birthplace (October 31, 1860) of Andrew Volstead. It was Volstead who guided the National Prohibition Act of 1919 through Congress. That law is usually called the Volstead Act.  

Kingston, RI is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Kiowa, KS was where Carry Nation began (1900) her ‘hatchetations’ of saloons and drug stores that sold alcohol.

La Grande, OR is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain. (See photo.)

Lakewood, CO was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 2001.

Lansing, MI is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Lapeer, MI is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Las Vegas, NM is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Lee, MA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Leominster, MA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Lincklaen, NY was the birthplace (March 17,1852) of  John B. Finch. He was chair of the Prohibition National Committee,  1884-1887.  

Lincoln, NE was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1920.

Litchfield County, CT was where about 200 farmers formed a temperance group 1n 1789. It discouraged drinking spirits, but not beer or wine.

Lockport, NY was the birthplace (March 19, 1879) of repeal leader John Jakob Raskob. He was a financier and executive of corporations, including General Motors.

Madera, CA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Malden, MA was the birthplace (December 24, 1932) of longtime leader of the Prohibition Party, Earl F. Dodge, Jr. He was highly controversial and devisive

Mandan, ND was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1983.

Medford, IN was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1955.

Medicine Lodge, KS was where Carry A. Nation moved in 1889 to manage a hotel.

Memphis, TN was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 2009.

Mercer County, IL was the birthplace (1867) of Oliver Stewart.  He was chair of the Prohibition National Committee from 1900 until 1905.  

Miami, FL was the winter home of Al Capone. His house was on Palm Island in Biscayne Bay between Miami and Miami Beach.

Midkiff, WV was the birthplace (October 3, 1931) of Jack Fellure. He was the presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in the election of 2012.  

Midway, KY was the birthplace (December 10, 1879) of repeal leader Jouett Shouse. As Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, he oversaw the Bureau of Prohibition.  After becoming convinced that Prohibition was unenforceable, he became president of the Association Against the Prohibition Amendment.

Milton, DE was the birthplace (April 24, 1872) of Clarence True Wilson, ‘America’s Number One Dry.’

Minneapolis, MN was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1991.

Montgomery, IN was the birthplace (August 23, 1847) of Hale Johnson. He was the vice-presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in the election of 1896.

Morton, WA was the birthplace (1943) of Gene Amondson. He was the presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in the elections of 2004 and 2008.

Mukwanago, WI, birthplace (November 1, 1852) of Eugene W. Chafin.  He was the presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in the elections of 1908 and 1912.

prohibition places

William Faulkner

New Albany, MS was the birthplace (September 25, 1897) of  two-time Pulitzer Prize winner and Nobel Prize winning writer and Repeal activist William Faulkner.

New Castle, PA was the birthplace (November 21, 1874) of Thomas W. Phillips, Jr. He was an organizer of the Republican Citizens Committee Against National Prohibition.

New Haven, CT was the birthplace ( May 23, 1875) of Alfred P. Sloan, Jr. He was a prominent leader of The Crusaders,  one of the major repeal groups.

Newnan, GA was near the birthplace (October 15, 1866) of William D. Upshaw. He was called ‘the driest of the dry’ in Congress.

Newton, NJ is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

prohibition places

James Fountain in Union Square Park

New York, NY was the birthplace (August 7,1824) of Gideon T. Stewart. He was the vice-presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in 1876. Also born in the city (c 1878) was temperance leader Henry H. Curran. The city was the birthplace (January 26, 1890) of Charles Scribner III. He was one of the leaders in the Association Against the Prohibition Amendment.  New York is the location the James Fountain in Union Square Park. It’s a temperance fountain donated by Daniel James. That park is also the location of a Dr, Henry Cogswell fountain.  New York City is one of the major Prohibition places in the country.

Niagara Falls, NY was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1936.

North Attleboro, MA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Norwich, VT is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain. (See photo.)

Oberlin, OH was where the Anti Saloon League was founded in 1893.

Ocean City, NJ is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Olympia, WA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Ontario, CA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Orange, CA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Orange, MA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Pacific Grove, CA was the location  of one of Dr. Henry Cogwell’s temperance fountains.

Palo Alto, CA was formed as a temperance town in 1894 by Jane and Leland Stanford.

Park River, ND is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Pawtucket, RI is the location of one of Dr. Henry Cogwell’s temperance fountains.    

Pembroke, MA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Pen Argyl, PA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Petaluma, CA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Petersburg, VA is where the Friends of Temperance was formed on November 29, 1865.

prohibition places

Ida B. Wise

Philadelphia, PA is where the American Temperance Union was established in 1836. It was the birthplace (July 3, 1871) of Ida B. Wise (Ida B. Wise-Smith), a president of the WCTU.  The prohibitionist Salvation Army held its first meeting in the U.S. in Philadelphia in 1879.

Pitman, NJ is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain. (See photo.)

Pittsburgh, PA was the site of the Prohibition Party conventions in 1884.

Pleasant Hill, AL  was the birthplace (1863) of  Sidney J. Catts. He was Governor of Florida from 1917 to 1921. Catts was the only governor elected under the sponsorship of the Prohibition Party alone. That had resulted from a conflict within the Democratic Party.

Portland, ME was the birthplace (March 20, 1804) of Neal Dow. He wrote and lobbied for the Maine Law. It was the first state-wide prohibition law in the U.S. Portland was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1976. It’s also the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Portland, OR is the location of temperance fountains donated by Simon Benson in 1912. They’re known today as Benson Bubblers.

Prohibition Park, NY. See Westerleigh, NY.

Reading,  PA was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1990.  It’s also the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Red Cloud, NE is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Reedley, CA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Rehoboth Beach, DE is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Reno, NV is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

prohibition places

Enoch A. Holtwick

Rhineland, MO was the birthplace (January 3, 1881) of Enoch A. Holtwick. He was presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in the election of 1956.

Richmond, KY was the birthplace (July 4, 1826) of Green Clay Smith. He was the presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in the election of 1876.

Richmond, VA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Riverside, CA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Rochester, NY was where the Woman’s New York State Temperance Society was organized on April 20 and 21,1852. It was also the location of one of Dr. Henry Cogwell’s temperance fountains.

Rockville, CT is the location of a temperance fountain donated by  Dr. Henry Cogswell.

Roseburg, OR is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Rushsylvania, OH was the birthplace (November 29, 1863) of Aaron S. Watkins.  He was a candidate of the Prohibition Party for many offices.  In 1920, it was for the presidency of the U.S. Watkins received six honorary degrees.

Saginaw, MI was the birthplace (November 4, 1874) of repeal leader Sewell Avery. He was prominent in The Crusaders, a powerful repeal group.

St. Joseph, IL was the birthplace (April 4, 1863) of Governor J. Frank Hanley, who organized the Flying Squadron of America. It was often called Hanley’s  Flying Squadron. Ironically, they usually took trains rather than planes.

St. Louis, MO is where the Knights of Father Mathew was formed in the U.S. in 1872.  It was also the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1963.

St. Paul, MN was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1916.

Salem, NJ is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Salisbury, MD was the birthplace (November 13, 1864) of Episcopal Bishop James Cannon, Jr.  Until his downfall, he was one of the most powerful temperance leaders in the U.S.

prohibition places

Faris & Brehm campaign button

Sandusky. OH was the birthplace (June 30, 1859) of Marie C. Brehm. She was the vice-presidental candidate of the Prohibition Party in the election of 1924.

San Francisco, CA  was the location of a temperance fountain donated by  Dr. Henry Cogswell.

San Jose, CA   was the location of one of Dr. Henry Cogwell’s temperance fountains.

Santa Ana, CA was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1977.

Santa Rosa, CA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain. (See photo.)

Saratoga County, NY was the place where a temperance society was formed by members of the Congregational Church in 1802.

Selma, CA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Shenanandoah, IA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Sonora, CA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

prohibition places

Mary H. Hunt

South Canaan, CT was the birthplace (June 4, 1830) of Mary H. Hunt, the single most powerful woman in the temperance movement. Learn the source of her power.

Springfield, IL was the site of the Prohibition Party conventions in 1985 and 1987.

Spring Lake, MI is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain. (See photo.)

Stillwater MN was the birthplace (October 21, 1855) of Howard Hyde Russell, the founder of the Anti-Saloon League.

Stone Mountain, near Atlanta, GA, is where the second Ku Klux Klan, often called the KKK of the 1920s, was was formed in 1915. It was largely created to defend the state-wide prohibition in Georgia.  Later, it worked with the WCTU to defend National Prohibition. They became partners in prohibition.      

Story County, IA was the birthplace (November 19, 1862) of  the professional baseball player who became the most famous famous temperance  preacher,  Billy Sunday.

Sullivan, IL is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Temperance, MI was founded as Bedford Center in 1859. When a post office was established in 1884, the name was changed to Temperance. This was at the suggestion of an influential member of the WCTU. She circulated a petition for the change. Both selling and consuming alcohol were prohibited during the early years of Temperance. A more appropriate name for the town would have been Prohibition.

Tolland, CT was the birthplace (March 3, 1820) of the eccentric Dr. Henry Cogswell, philanthropic builder of temperance fountains.

Uxbridge, MA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Van Wert, OH was the birthplace (1858) of WCTU president Ella Boole.

Village Green, PA was the birthplace (November 24, 1916) of George Ormsby. He was the vive-presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in the elections of 1988 and 1992.  

Vineland, NJ was founded as an non-alcohol utopia in 1861 by land developer Charles K. Landis. He advertised in Italy to attract grape growers. Thomas B. Welch bought the grapes grown there to produce grape juice.

prohibition places

The Methodist Building

Washington, DC was where the Congressional Temperance Society was formed in 1833. It is the location of a temperance fountain given by eccentric Dr. Henry Cogswell in 1882.  In 1905, the Statue of Frances E. Willard was placed in Statuary Hall in the U.S. Capitol.  The Methodist Board of Temperance, Prohibition, and Public Morals built the Methodist Building in 1923. It’s on Capitol Hill directly across the street from the Capitol building.  The National Conference of Organizations Supporting the 18th Amendment was formed in the city in 1930.  Of course, Washington is where all the national laws about prohibition and its repeal were passed. There are too many to list.  Of all the prohibition places in the U.S., Washington is clearly the most important.

Watsonville, CA is the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Westerleigh, NY is a neighborhood in Staten Island, New York City. It began as a town called Prohibition Park, NY. It was founded by members of the Prohibition Party after they bought the land in 1887. All land deeds prohibited ‘the use, manufacture, or sale of liquor.’ Streets were named after prominent temperance leaders. The headquarters of the Party were located there. Financial problems ensued. In 1907, New York City bought much of the land and Prohibition Park became Westerleigh.

Westerville, OH is where the Anti-Saloon League moved its headquarters in 1909. It also operated its enormous  American Issue Publishing Company there. The Westerville Public Library has useful Anti-Saloon materials available on-line.  Westerville is one of the most important prohibition places.

Westview, OH was the birthplace (June 12, 1883) of Mamie White Colvin, who usually called herself Mrs. D. Leigh Colvin.  She was a president of the WCTU.

Wheeling, WV was the birthplace (1892) of George Cassiday, the main bootlegger to Congress. He became known as ‘The Man in the Green Hat.’ Learn why.

Wichita, KS was the site of the Prohibition Party convention in 1971. It’s also  the location of a WCTU temperance fountain.

Wilkes-Barre, PA was the birthplace (March 5, 1839) of Silas Swallow. He was the presidential candidate of the Prohibition Party in the election of 1904.

Wilmington, DE was the birthplace (January 15, 1870) of Pierre S. du Pont He was chair of the United Repeal Council. The city was also the birthplace (October 12, 1880) of Lammot du Pont II. He was a founder of the Republican Citizens Committee Against National Prohibition.

Wingville, WI was the birthplace (May 4, 1875) of the author of the 21st Amendment, John J. Blaine. He’s also known for introducing the Blaine Act. That act began the process of leading to Repeal.

Winona Lake, IN was the site of the Prohibition Party conventions in 1955 and 1959.

 

A Search for Prohibition Places

Prohibition places exist all over the country. If you know of a temperance place that should be included, please contact your host at hansondj  [at sign] potsdam [dot] edu. Thank you.